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Your Voice, Your Choice 2020

Graphic from Seattle Department of Neighborhoods

Entries are submittable by clicking on the graphic above, until March 18. Entries can now be categorized based on use and on infrastructure type.

Now’s your chance to bring your personal experiences with our streets to the official attention of the City of Seattle. To kick things off, Gordon at Seattle Neighborhood Greenways has put out a call for people to identify opportunities for pedestrian improvements at intersections, under the “Pedestrian Crossing” category.

But there is a wide variety of other avenues under which to file a concern.

Some tips: be specific and descriptive about the problem(s) you want to have solved, and be direct and explicit in describing any possible solution(s) you feel strongly about. It’s not our jobs as citizens to design the solutions, though, so you don’t need to have spent a ton of time on a vision for the end result–your real-time experiences and your ability to describe the problem are voice enough.

UPDATES IN 2020: Safe Routes to School, MLK Day, PBLs, and more

We have a solid amount of updates to run through since last September: from new committees, to old projects coming back into the picture, Central Seattle Greenways has been plugging away through the fall and winter to set us up for a productive 2020.

New things in 2019 & 2020:

Racial Equity Committee: In the summer of 2019, SNG brought members together from neighborhood groups all over the city–including CSG–to attend orientations for better developing our collective racial equity lens. In the early fall, we drafted and established a Racial Equity statement, with specific acknowledgement of our own group’s geographic area, with the historically marginalized Central District and Little Saigon.

KL Shannon kicked off the idea–and helped set us up–for joining the MLK Day workshops, rally, and march hosted annually at Garfield High School. The theme for 2020 was “20/20 Vision,” and CSG’s Whitney Johnson partnered with Rainier Valley Greenways‘ Andrew Kidde and Beacon Hill Safe Streets‘ Brett Youngstrom to co-chair the crafting of our workshop, “Greenways, not Redlines.” Our workshop explored the data and stories of the Seattle communities–especially the Central District–that were openly discriminated against through the practice of redlining, and the subsequent (and ongoing) inequalities in the built environment that simultaneously result from and spur on this discrimination. Inadequate, dangerous infrastructure was a big focus of our round-robin-style discussion stations.

As of this March, we are revisiting the next steps we want to take to keep racial equity as a key lens through which we see our work.

Pike PBLs: The construction of the Pike PBLs from 9th Ave eastward/uphill to Broadway was a celebrated step in expanding access and safety in our neighborhoods. In the fall and winter, our group leaders Brie & David stayed on top of developments with some SDOT project staff to affirm the need for a careful and truly accessible design to connect this new stretch of protected bike lanes with the existing downtown portion (2nd Ave to 7th Ave). Part of what we are working towards is getting clear signage installed for cyclists and drivers going through these few blocks, since cyclists are meant to ride on the sidewalks that span the Convention Center atrium while SDOT works on the design for that stretch.

Moving forward, we are still in need of that signage. We are also gearing up to lead an outreach effort to inform and collect feedback from businesses and stakeholders (the Washington State Convention Center is a prominent one). We will use this information to continue to work with SDOT to shape a design that can speak to the concerns of all of those involved in the coming changes.

Broadway Crossing Improvements at Denny: The problem with this intersection is that currently, none of its users are being properly accommodated. What started as a joint effort between City of Seattle’s (beloved) Dongho Chang and CSG to achieve an adequately-timed scramble pedestrian signalization has, in 2019, become complicated by construction on the Station House Apartments, the abrupt ending of the protected bike lane that was initially built as part of the First Hill Streetcar project scope, and by the signalization that is currently in place.

The walk signalization did most recently allow for an all-walk period whose signal length has been extended to almost be enough time to cross diagonally, for pedestrians who use assistance. It also shows north-south crossing when north-south vehicle traffic has a green light. There is no signal that is east-west when the east-west vehicle traffic has a green light. CSG’s primary concern with this configuration is the lack of signage that lets pedestrians know a) that they can actually cross diagonally over Broadway–sometimes; b) that this opportunity does not happen in a predictable cycle of signal changes; and c) how long either of the two types of signals will last, until the countdown kicks in and people realize they actually could have crossed diagonally if they had just known beforehand how these signals behave.

Additionally, due to the curtailing of the FH streetcar tracks at just before Denny (and the prolonged delay on funding the leg of the project that would have brought it further north up Broadway), the two-way protected bike lane that stops juuust north of Denny Way leaves cyclists traveling in either direction with a sudden decision to make. Northbound bikes must merge with traffic (but with no signage as of yet to warn people this is the case), and southbound bikes nearing this intersection must find a way to travel across an opposing lane of car traffic to get into the PBL, or else be left riding around/between the streetcar rails. For southbound cyclists especially, suddenly “turning left” across car traffic to get into the infrastructure that is best for them can happen in a couple different ways (staying to the right and then using a crosswalk moment to get over, anticipating the streetscape change and moving as left as possible among cars as they come down toward the intersection) but why guess at what might work, when adequate information on the road could provide a predictable, legal way for riders to act in concert with pedestrians and cars?

On the upside, putting this intersection under some scrutiny has led to the possibility for SDOT to facilitate street painting here by local artists, perhaps sometime in 2020. There is no specific design yet, but the idea is to cover the intersection to visually demarcate the areas of the intersection where all-walk signalization implies travel–and also to add some playful intrigue to this area that leads into the reinvented Barbara Bailey Festival Street (festival street permit granted through the work of our own leader Brie) where the Broadway Farmer’s Market will be relocated, upon completion of Station House Apts construction in 2020.

Eastlake PBLs: In 2019, planning design for protected bike lanes along Eastlake Ave reached 30% and will continue into late 2020. Our group, among many others in the city, appreciates that Mayor Durkan seemed to change her tacit tune on bicycle safety and infrastructure and began to support this project. Cascade Bicycle Club’s policy manager recruited some of our own CSG members to help in outreach efforts to businesses along Eastlake Ave in January 2020. Please check out SDOT’s page on the project to get the full scoop.

E Union PBLs: Also to reach 30% design in 2019 was the E Union St protected bike lane planning! Where currently a mix of painted bike lanes and sharrows help move cyclists from 14th Ave eastward to MLK Way, SDOT is now planning construction of a protected bike lane–with partial parking-protected buffering–to be complete sometime in the summer of 2020. CSG was visited multiple times to give feedback and insight on our members’ specific connections with this part of our neighborhood. SDOT engineers have told us that businesses that were part of their outreach efforts generally responded politely to the modifications. The official information on the this project can be found here.

News from Continued Projects in 2019:

Bailey Gatzert Safe Routes to School: Some backstory on this project can be found here. In 2019, CSG was granted approval by SDOT to host and implement a playstreet around Bailey Gatzert Elementary School sometime in 2020. The planning for that event is still underway.

Concerns with infrastructure and gang-related harassment of students walking to school also reached CSG, and a contract was established between the school, SDOT, SPD, and CSG to launch a parent-staffed walking school bus program to ensure safety and efficiency in travel to and from school. The walking school bus program launched in February 2020, beginning with four routes. CSG has noted that parents and school administration alike are reacting positively to this transportation option.

On the infrastructure level, CSG has plans for business outreach efforts in Little Saigon, the Central District, and Yesler Terrace, to help the communities around Bailey Gatzert represent their perceptions of the chewed-up, car-heavy streets in this area. An urban planning class at the University of Washington showed great interest in a practicum aspect of this outreach and overall effort to improve conditions in this area, and a partnership with the UW may happen in one of the coming quarter’s courses. As of this writing in March 2020, CSG is taking these efforts at a more considerate pace, given the impact on our communities’ and public institutions’ spurred on by the risks perceived in our city during the appearance of COVID-19. We understand that schools, institutions, and our neighbors are responding as best as possible to the more pressing concerns of health and racial discrimination that are arising from this perceived risk.

Melrose Ave: Some backstory on this project can be found here. Improvements along Melrose Ave continue, most recently in order to connect the Melrose Promenade with the Pike/Pine bike lanes. Initial schematic design has been made available to our group in late 2019.

Madison BRT (RapidRide G Line): Although not directly a project with CSG involvement, this new bus rapid transit line can and will affect our neighborhoods upon implementation. The concept is simple: connect the Central District and Madrona to downtown using the already-existing most-direct-route, Madison Ave. There is no foreseen conflict between this project and the E Union PBLs. The official information on this project can be found here.

Vision Zero: Analyzing data in the context of Vision Zero in Seattle revealed that pedestrian deaths reached an all-time high since the initiative’s launch. In 2020, SNG has called on the city and on the citizens to sit down and get specific about what is going wrong with the increase in accidents between motor vehicles and other more vulnerable street users. Some other sources of action and information about Vision Zero can be found at the SDOT blog, at Seattle Bike Blog, and at SNG’s site, among other places.

Seattle Neighborhood Greenways 2020 Priorities: Here is SNG’s newsletter detailing its 2020 priorities. In December 2019, SNG asked its neighborhood groups to collectively identify some things that would definitely deserve focus throughout the new year in order to be as successful as possible. CSG, as part of this process, saw some common themes pop up in the Safe Routes to School, racial equity, and policy arenas that we in turn can keep in mind as a group as we work on our area’s projects: the Georgetown-South Park trail, City Equitable Action, pedestrian-prioritized signal policy, Complete Streets metric adjustment policy, and Rainier Ave Fix-It.

Additional Things We’ve Heard for 2020:

Black Farmers Collective: YES Farms, founded by the Black Farmers Collective, has taken the formerly-“undevelopable” land between Yesler Terrace and the I-5/Dearborn Overpass and brought the immediate community together to grow, harvest, and teach agriculture as a resource for Yesler Terrace.

Terry Ave Redevelopment: The Berger Partnership has begun collecting public input in its beginning stages of designing Phase I (Marion to Cherry) of Terry Ave on First Hill. The goal is to bring life back to this street that houses many community institutions.

Dept of Clean Greenways: Two CSG members, Marissa Zhao and Eric Westberg, formed this small-but-efficient work force to tackle Seattle’s leafy, soggy, gravelly bike lanes and shared greenways, in response to inadequate maintenance by the City of Seattle–especially in the winter months. The group aims to partner with like-minded greenway users across the city to get together, get to know each other, get outside, and hopefully convey how much it helps for our facilities to be as clean as that of cars. As we head into spring, the group plans to continue setting up work parties along greenways such as the Pike PBLs and the Burke Gilman Trail. Stay tuned here.

Traffic Signals for People: In our March meeting, Dustin Carlino demonstrated the project that he’s been running on Traffic Signals for People. As a user-driven resource, Traffic Signals for People uses Open Streets (GIS) to collect data on the nature of intersections in the city of Seattle–especially problematic and ineffective ones. Anyone with chops for data collection, GIS, and bettering the Seattle pedestrian experience can join the effort here.

Hopefully I’m Not Missing Anything…

Please comment below, comment in an email to us, or come to our meetings with questions, concerns, and ideas! Additionally, you can subscribe to our Google Group and to Seattle Neighborhood Greenways at large in the “JOIN US” box to the right.

Pike/Pine Protected Bike Lanes: Outreach and Recommendations

We partnered with other community organizations to find out what people and businesses need from their street.

Central Seattle Greenways has been advocating for protected bike lanes in the Pike/Pine corridor for several years. So when Seattle City Council passed a resolution in the summer of 2018 requiring temporary infrastructure be installed in 2019, we rolled up our sleeves.

Our pop-up protected bike lane showed people what a lane might look like.

Done right, protected bike lanes not only increase the number of people biking and keep them safe, but the lanes improve conditions for people walking and rolling, boost local business sales, and enhance the neighborhood. It’s important the City get the design right in this vital and vibrant corridor. In order to advocate effectively for the needs of people who live, work, and travel in the corridor, we wanted to find out more about how people use the street and what the broader community prioritizes.

To that end, we partnered with Capitol Hill EcoDistrict, Cascade Bike Club, the Capitol Hill Community Council, and other community organizations to create a pop-up protected bike lane for PARK(ing) Day, conduct direct business outreach, host a community design workshop, and distribute an online survey.

150 community members attended the workshop to discuss the street design.

We’ve shared all of our data — every comment, every statistic, every bit of information we gleaned — with the Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT), and now we’re sharing our summary and analysis along with recommendations for the design of the corridor. (You can download the full report below.)

Community Priorities

Several strong priorities emerged from our community outreach. We believe each of these priorities is important, and that we can have a street design that meets all of these goals:

  • Pedestrian safety and comfort
  • A continuous, safe, intuitive bike route
  • Ample loading zones for businesses and passengers
  • Clear, predictable traffic flow for all users

Recommendations

Given the priorities and concerns that surfaced, we have some recommendations for SDOT in designing the street.

Long-term
Based on our conversations with SDOT, we presented two options to the community: Option 1 was to build separate one-way lanes on Pike between Broadway and Minor/Melrose, and Option 2 was to build a two-way bikeway on the north side of Pike for those blocks. But at the workshop, through the survey, during business outreach, and in other conversations, we often heard, unbidden, a strong desire for something different: one-way streets all the way to Broadway with a westbound lane entirely on Pine and an eastbound lane entirely on Pike. Creating a couplet of one-way streets all the way to Broadway provides clarity for people walking, biking, and driving; delivers a more intuitive route that cyclists are more likely to use; and shares the perceived burden and benefits of a bike lane for business owners on both Pike and Pine.

We believe this option deserves careful study and consideration by the City. Our strong recommendation is that SDOT construct the temporary bike lanes between Broadway and Minor/Melrose in a way that does not preclude extending the Pike Pine Renaissance street design all the way to Broadway in a few years.

Between the two options on Pike, there was no consensus about whether to separate the directional lanes (one on each side of the street) or to create a two-way bikeway, like the ones on Broadway and 2nd Ave. The general opinion is that separated lanes, especially given the grade and resulting speed differential, are preferred if the transition for eastbound riders from the left side of Pike to the right is handled well (so that it’s clear to all users what’s happening, doesn’t require people biking to wait through multiple light phases to move over, and is safe).

There was no strong consensus about which street the bike lane should use to cross from Pike to Pine, but workshop groups and survey respondents both requested that the crossover street be calmed and that signals and signage be clear.

Short-term
If the transition from the existing left-hand eastbound lanes on Pike to right-hand eastbound lanes can be managed so that it is safe, intuitive, and sensible to people biking, we recommend separating the directional lanes on either side of Pike.

We’ve seen an early-stage proposal from SDOT to install temporary lanes on either side of Pike all the way down to Hubbell, using the light at Hubbell to move eastbound cyclists to the right side of the street via a diagonal cross-bike (similar to Westlake and 9th), with a two-way bikeway between Hubbell and 8th Avenue. We believe this is an elegant interim solution that avoids the challenges of a transition at Minor/Melrose, and we fully support it.

Areas that require particular care
Workshop participants, survey respondents, and other community members expressed concern about the street design in some specific areas:

  • Transitions between two-way and one-way bike lane configurations or where the lane moves to the other side of the street. Signage, road markings, and clear design are important here.
  • Clarity of design. Both temporary and permanent configurations must be well-signed and designed in a way that makes the intended use very clear and intuitive to people driving, biking, walking, and rolling.
  • Intersections. Particular care must be given to potential points of conflict between people walking, rolling, biking, and driving.

Pop-up protected bike lane!

Hundreds of people bike up Pike Street every day, but they have no dedicated space, jostling with cars and buses as they climb the hill. On September 21, 2018, one block of that hill was a bit safer and easier.

For Park(ing) Day, Central Seattle Greenways and our friends at Cascade Bicycle Club, the Capitol Hill EcoDistrict, and the Northwest School transformed parking spaces into a protected bike lane.

It was the ultimate in tactical urbanism — quickly built using planters generously donated for the day by Ragen & Associates, orange plastic bollards provided by SDOT, and signs created by volunteers. Snacks, courtesy of Central Coop, awaited those who opted to stop and talk with us for a while.

Planters made the lane aesthetically pleasing. Several people were disappointed to find out this wasn’t a permanent improvement.

Park(ing) Day provides a great chance to highlight opportunities to make space for people in general. This year’s pop-up protected bike lane was also part of our ongoing project to ensure the community has a voice in the design of the protected bike lanes coming to the Pike/Pine corridor. We’ve also been reaching out to the business community to ensure their needs are met in the design and that they can participate in the process.

You can add your voice at the Pike/Pine Protected Bike Lane Community Design Workshop on Thursday, October 25!

Though we felt only a few sprinkles during the day, we enjoyed a rainbow late in the afternoon. Surely a sign of great things to come!

 

Capitol Hill Station Access Audit

BY DAVID SEATER

On February 29, 2016, Central Seattle Greenways volunteers and Seattle Neighborhood Greenways staff met at Capitol Hill Station to conduct an accessibility audit of the station area. We focused on three priorities: safety of street crossings, obstructions in crosswalks and along sidewalks, and sidewalk capacity. The station is expected to serve 14,000 riders every day in 2030, making safety and accessibility of the entrances a significant priority.

The map below shows the audit area. Intersections that were assessed are circled, station entrances are marked with stars. Specifically, the intersections were: Broadway E & E John St / E Olive Way, Broadway E & E Denny Way, Broadway Ave E & E Thomas St, Harvard Ave E & E Olive Way, and 10th Ave E & E John St.

Map

Assessed intersection are circled in red, station entrances are marked with green stars. (Map from Google Maps, annotations by David Seater)

We identified several common problems at the intersections and the sidewalks connecting them:

  • Obstructions (poles, hydrants) in or very near curb ramps
  • Obstructions (poles, signal cabinets, A-boards) blocking painted crosswalks
  • Ramps misaligned on opposite sides of a crosswalk
  • Ramps turned at an angle to the crosswalk
  • Drivers making dangerous turns through occupied crosswalks
  • Difficult crossings of John (at 10th) and Olive (at Harvard)
  • Sidewalks narrowed by obstructions (trash cans, newspaper boxes, A-boards, shelters)

Easy Wins – Quick, low cost solutions:

  1. Relocate trash cans and newspaper boxes to be further from crosswalks and ramps
  2. Move trash cans and newspaper boxes closer to the curb to open up sidewalk space
  3. Work with businesses to prevent A-boards from blocking crosswalks and sidewalks
  4. Install crosswalk markings and signs at Harvard & Olive Way and 10th & John
  5. Install better signage and lane markings to prevent left turns from northbound Broadway to westbound Denny Way
  6. Coordinate with King County Metro to place bus shelters without obstructing sidewalks
  7. Patch utility cuts with asphalt to cover existing gravel and create a smooth surface
  8. Remove or replace the old bike rack on the sidewalk on the west side of Broadway between John and Thomas

Future Opportunities – Sidewalk and ramps:

  1. Relocate or underground utility and signal control cabinets. Many of these are placed directly in the path of marked crosswalks, creating a barrier and reducing capacity. This is particularly apparent at the main station entrance on the southeast corner of Broadway E & E John St.
  2. Relocate utility and signal poles, many of which are blocking marked crosswalks. Some of the poles are partially blocking ADA ramps.
  3. Relocate fire hydrants that are blocking crosswalks and ADA ramps. These are particularly difficult for people with impaired vision to navigate around.
  4. Align ADA ramps on both sides of crosswalks so that people walking across the street can travel in a straight line without encountering an unexpected curb.
  5. Orient ADA ramps to be aligned with the crosswalk instead of at an angle. In particular, avoid using a single ramp that directs people walking into the middle of the intersection. The new ramp directly in front of the main station entrance at Broadway E & E John St is a particularly egregious example of what not to do.

Safety Improvements – Arterial crosswalks:

  1. Rechannelize E John St / E Olive Way to add left turn lanes at Broadway E. The lack of turn lanes here causes drivers to change lanes unexpectedly as they approach and move through the intersection.
  2. Add left turn signal phases in all directions at Broadway E & E John St / E Olive Way. When the intersection is busy it’s common for drivers attempting to turn left to loiter in crosswalks or in the intersection waiting for a gap in oncoming traffic without watching for people crossing in the crosswalk. This leads to dangerous situations when drivers try to turn through an occupied crosswalk.
  3. Improve the crossings at Harvard & Olive Way and 10th & John with raised intersections, curb bulbs, or other traffic calming measures. Many drivers do not yield to people trying to walk across these intersections.

Examples:

Obstructed crosswalk, Broadway E & E John St

Obstructed crosswalk, Broadway E & E John St (photo from Seattle Neighborhood Greenways)

Obstructed Crosswalk 2

Obstructed crosswalk, Broadway E & E John St (photo from Seattle Neighborhood Greenways)

Obstructed crosswalk, Broadway E & E Thomas St

Obstructed crosswalk, Broadway E & E Thomas St (photo from Seattle Neighborhood Greenways)

Sidewalk obstructions, Broadway E & E Thomas St

Sidewalk obstructions, Broadway E & E Thomas St (photo from Seattle Neighborhood Greenways)

Left-turning car stuck in crosswalk, Broadway E & E John St / E Olive Way

Left-turning car stuck in crosswalk, Broadway E & E John St / E Olive Way (photo from David Seater)

Illegal turns into occupied crosswalk, Broadway E & E Denny Way

Illegal turns into occupied crosswalk, Broadway E & E Denny Way (photo from David Seater)

Failure to yield, 10th Ave E & E John St

Failure to yield, 10th Ave E & E John St (photo from David Seater)

Old bike rack, Broadway E between E John and E Thomas Streets

Old bike rack, Broadway E between E John and E Thomas Streets (photo from Seattle Neighborhood Greenways)

Places for People: 12th Ave Square Park Now Open

12th and james court.jpg

12th Avenue and E James Court in 2008. The property on the left is now an apartment building, the property on the right is now a park. (Click for enlarged view)

East James Court used to be a little cut through street with parking along both sides, remarkable only in its unremarkableness, a way for cars to get between 12th Avenue and 13th and to store their cars for a two-hour block of time. But not a place where anyone likely felt a strong desire to spend a whole lot of time.

20160416_104048

Now East James Court is a complementary space next to the newest park in central Seattle, directly between Capitol Hill and the Central District. On April 14, the grand opening ceremony was held for this park, which includes one of the biggest pieces of public art to be added to Seattle Parks properties in many years, the “Cloud Veil”, designed by Ellen Sollod.

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The grand opening ceremony. Photo credit: No Spandex Required

The grand opening ceremony. Photo credit: No Spandex Required

Visit 12th Ave Square Park to witness another example of spaces for cars becoming places for people. Grab a coffee at Cherry Street, or a bite to eat at Ba Bar, take a seat under the Cloud Veil, and marvel at the difference on 12th Avenue now compared with a few short years ago.

 

Summer Parkways is coming to the Central Area!

Where can you bike, walk, dance, climb rocks, skateboard, see bike polo, listen to music, and so much more? Summer Parkways! Three miles of streets and the four parks they connect will come alive on Saturday, September 12. Be there! Pages from SSP Postcard

Summer Parkways kicks off with a grand opening celebration of the first section of the new Central Area Neighborhood Greenway, providing safe and comfortable streets for people biking and walking from S. Jackson to E. John. Join us at 11:00 a.m. at Garfield Community Center for the speechifying, ribbon-cutting, and celebratory bike parade.

At the same time, the buff and adventurous Disaster Relief Trials contestants will set off to gather water and other necessities, travel over challenging terrain, and generally do the things we’d need done in a natural disaster. Cheer them on at the start line! (See Tom’s post on Seattle Bike Blog for more info and great video.)

Summer Parkways festivities go from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Bike a bit, and then take in some music, bounce around on a harness trampoline, climb a rock, eat some food, and meet some folks from around the neighborhood, other parts of the city, or out of town.

As you’d expect, it’s going to take a lot of volunteers to pull this off. If you’d like to help, go to http://www.cascade.org/summerparkways, and use Cascade Bike Club’s volunteer portal to find the right fit.

The following weekend, on September 19, the focus shifts to Ballard for another family-friendly fun-packed party in the streets.We’re modeling Summer Parkways after the incredibly successful Sunday Parkways events in Portland. Check out this video to see why we’re so excited.

Ted Virdone braves Seattle rain with Central Greenways

Who is willing to give up a Saturday morning to spend it out in the rain?

Central Greenways fearless volunteer leaders - Merlin and Brie - talking at Columbia and 18th  about plans for Columbia St. and Ridge Route greenways.

Central Seattle Greenways volunteer leaders, Merlin and Brie, talking at Columbia and 18th about plans for Columbia St. and Ridge Route greenways.

Happily, several Central Seattle Greenway volunteers and Ted Virdone, a staff member for Seattle City Councilmember Kshama Sawant. We met on Saturday, January 17 at a cafe for a quick ‘briefing’ before heading out on a bike tour of planned future greenways. It was an exciting opportunity to educate Ted and Councilmember Sawant on Central Seattle Greenways and the work happening in our neighborhood to make streets safer for all users.

After visiting one of the first implemented greenways in the East District, we set out to explore short segments of multiple routes that the community is hoping to see established in the near future, including:

  • Columbia St. Greenway
  • Ridge Route Greenway
  • Union St. Protected Bike Lane
  • 27th Ave Greenway

 

You can help move these and other projects forward in 2015. Already this year we’re seeing movement on the Madison BRT Project, construction of the Central Greenway paralleling 23rd Ave from Rainier Ave S to Montlake, and Vision Zero. Come out and join your neighbors in a movement for safe streets.

Ted Virdone, surrounded by Central Greenways volunteers, discussing a future greenway route in the central neighborhood.

Ted Virdone, surrounded by Central Greenways volunteers on January 17, discussing a future greenway route in the central neighborhood.

Central Seattle Greenways meets the second Monday of each month at 6pm. Check our Facebook page or sign up to join our email list for details of upcoming meetings and projects.

Join us 12.6.13 to discuss future Greenways

Join us Friday, December 6th at 6:30 PM at the Central Cinema to discuss how we can help bring safe streets to our neighborhoods.

360 image by Adam Parast

SDOT has secured funding for two greenways in our neighborhoods! The top candidates are the “23rd corridor greenway” now called the Central Greenway which you may have heard about at the open house, and our priority “ridge route” now called the Ridge Greenway that is already a popular way for people to walk and bike along the ridge of the CD/Capitol Hill. That’s a lot of funding for safe and comfortable streets in our neighborhoods! 

This is a really exciting and important time to get involved. We really need all hands on deck for the next few months to make the most of this opportunity. Come to the restaurant area at Central Cinema Friday December 6th at 6:30 PM to get involved. If you can’t make it but still want to help please be in touch.
How you can help
  1. Make introductions to local groups, organizations, churches, councils etc. SDOT will be able to make some presentations to these groups, and we may end up partnering with SDOT for these conversations or conducting some of our own outreach.
  2. Help us host smaller neighborhood meetings: SDOT is planning to host another mega meeting, but it would be wise for us to host a few smaller meetings in Capitol Hill and the Central District. This is something I hope to discuss further next week – come with your ideas!
  3. Spread the word: Do you know someone who is interested in getting involved? Bring them next Friday to our meeting! Or invite them to the Google Group. We will also need your help spreading the word about other upcoming events and talking to the public about what greenways are (hint: think traffic calmed streets with safe intersections)

We hope to see you on Friday!

Nov 6th public meeting on 23rd corridor greenway possibilities

Montlake Greenways leader Lionel Job explains potential safety improvements for seniors, kids, and people accessing the Boyer Clinic.

Montlake Greenways leader Lionel Job explains potential safety improvements for seniors, kids, and people accessing the Boyer Clinic.

Tonight, in a packed room, neighbors Capitol Hill, Montlake, the Central District, and Madison Valley heard about what greenways are from SDOT. Top concerns voiced by community members were the potential impact of the 23rd Ave arterial repaving project putting additional cars onto neighborhood streets, being able to safely cross arterials, speeding and volume of school drop off car traffic, and the need for safe routes for families to walk and bike to where they need to go. There was no consensus about where greenway safety improvements would be best suited. Negative emotions ran high about the 23rd Ave E arterial repaving project and spilled over into other conversations.

Central Seattle Greenways hopes SDOT and safe streets advocates are able to refocus the conversation on the neighborhoods’ shared concerns of reducing cut through traffic on neighborhood streets, slowing speeding drop off traffic, and providing safe ways for our aging population to walk to parks and kids to safely bike to school.

Nov 6 23d corridor gway meeting

There is common ground to have a quality conversation moving forward. In addition, we hope that the conversation about the 23rd Ave E arterial project and greenway safety improvements can be separated.

Thank you to everyone who came out in support tonight! We will need your passion, ideas, and hard work moving forward to help create safer streets in our communities. If you would like to sign our letter thanking SDOT for investing in safer streets in our communities and to receive updates from your local greenway group please click here.